Attack of the Giant Chicken!  (just kidding). Sermon for March 12, 2017

Text: Luke 13:1-9, 31-35

1 At that very time there were some present who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. 2 He asked them, “Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were worse sinners than all other Galileans? 3 No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish as they did. 4 Or those eighteen who were killed when the tower of Siloam fell on them—do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others living in Jerusalem? 5 No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish just as they did.” 6 Then he told this parable: “A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came looking for fruit on it and found none. 7 So he said to the gardener, “See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?’ 8 He replied, “Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig around it and put manure on it. 9 If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.’ ”

31 At that very hour some Pharisees came and said to him, “Get away from here, for Herod wants to kill you.” 32 He said to them, “Go and tell that fox for me, “Listen, I am casting out demons and performing cures today and tomorrow, and on the third day I finish my work. 33 Yet today, tomorrow, and the next day I must be on my way, because it is impossible for a prophet to be killed outside of Jerusalem.’ 34 Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often have I desired to gather your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! 35 See, your house is left to you. And I tell you, you will not see me until the time comes when you say, “Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord.’ 
Attack of the Giant Leeches.      

ARGH! Giant Chicken!

Attack of the Killer Tomatoes

Attack of the 50 Ft Woman

Attack of the crab monsters

The Fly,

The Giant Gila Monster

The Killer Shrews

and of course, yet another King Kong movie came out this week. Those are some 1950’s sci-fi movies of attacking animals (with a fruit/vegetable tossed in there). That list doesn’t include things the Blob, Godzilla, and the space aliens and then the regular sized attacking sharks, pirañas snakes, spiders, and birds, that according to Hollywood have threatened the world as we know it. However, no killer chickens. No Attacking hens.
I guess Hollywood just doesn’t get how threatening a chicken can be. Not so, the pharisees, the religious leaders, Herod, or Pilate and the Romans for that matter. Of course, when they look at Jesus, when they heard about him, they didn’t think chicken. That’s just how he describes the divine love for humanity—in terms of a chicken gathering her little ones under her wings. No flapping wings and pecking beak. So, if it wasn’t the image of a chicken that threatened and scared them, it had to be something else. Because yet again, Jesus tells his disciples/his followers that he is going Jerusalem to die, actually be killed in Jerusalem, and it’s not like some blast of radiation is going to turn him into a giant mutant. But make no mistake, he is a threat. Oh, we don’t necessarily see, we may not hear it in these verses assigned for today. It’s more what is unsaid.  
Our gospel begins with the words, “at that very time”. What very time? Well, Jesus has been making his way to Jerusalem, but he’s not going alone. In fact, he’s not even just with a few disciples. Luke has told us there were crowds coming out to him. In the previous chapter, Luke writes that thousands of people— “thousands so that they trampled on one another” were coming to Jesus. Sounds like Jesus is doing a really good job of gathering people. We know later from our reading this morning, that Jesus wants the same thing for the people of Jerusalem. Could that be what attracts the attention of the authorities? The Romans really do not care how many people Jesus heals, even if it’s on a sabbath. 
But gathering crowds, that’s like rallies and marches. Mobilizing people is power, and can be threatening.   
Of course, we know that Jesus doesn’t describe himself as a wolf with his pack or a even a lion leading his pride. Jesus isn’t collecting swords and spears; he isn’t arming the people with weapons of war. He describes himself as a hen gathering her chicks. Still, we can’t underestimate the threat of people coming together. See, the world, the Romans, the powers that be don’t want to see that. They want to keep us apart. They don’t want us mingling together. You know why? Because when we don’t get together it’s easier to instill fear in us. Keep us apart, keeps us ignorant, and then we’ll believe all sorts of stuff. When we do not meet with one another, when we do not listen to one another, when we don’t listen to one another, we might believe it when someone says: “Just like Jesus said, ‘The poor will always be with us,’” “There is a group of people that just don’t want health care and aren’t going to take care of themselves.” “Just, like, homeless people. … I think just morally, spiritually, socially, [some people] just don’t want health care,” and “The Medicaid population, which is [on] a free credit card, as a group, do probably the least preventive medicine and taking care of themselves and eating healthy and exercising. And I’m not judging, I’m just saying socially that’s where they are. So there’s a group of people that even with unlimited access to health care are only going to use the emergency room when their arm is chopped off or when their pneumonia is so bad they get brought [into] the ER.” Those are the words of Kansas representative Roger Marshall. It’s bad enough he said that, but it’s worse that so many people will believe it because they haven’t spent real time with people, with people living in poverty—people who do not have easy access (location or ability to pay for) fresh fruits, who can’t afford gym memberships, and don’t have safe streets or parks to walk in. Who spend hours of their life waiting for buses. Who buy cell phones because it’s cheaper than a landline, and it’s the way we communicate these days. Who do want health care, would love to go to a doctor, take their children to a doctor, and not have to sit in emergency waiting rooms.

    We can know this, because Jesus gathers us together, and that is a threat. You know, Jesus’ talk about repentance doesn’t have to focus on the individual. I imagine that if Rep. Marshall spent some good quality time, lived with people in poverty, with the hard-working poor, he just might have a real come to Jesus moment. And that my friends, to the powers that be and want it to stay that way, can be awfully threatening because he doesn’t let the worldview stand—a world view that is simple, and for some comforting. You know, if you can look at tragedies and make sense out of them by assigning blame and pointing fingers, well that’s a real simple formula. God sends misfortune to punish. That can actually comfort some people. But that’s not how it works, says Jesus. It’s not a simple formula. God doesn’t strike us down, God doesn’t play tit or tat. Nope, Jesus says, we can’t ease our minds and make ourselves feel better. The world wants us to think we are in this by and for ourselves. It wants us lonely and hurting, at each others throats. Jesus threatens that world by The only peace we get comes from gathering with others around our savior. Jesus yearns to pull us close to one another so that we can know one another—truly know. Know our pains, know our joys, support, care, and hold one another. Jesus offers us a different peace and a place with God for all, let me say that again, for all of us, no exceptions, all together under her wings. Amen.

 

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