“You’re not you when you’re hungry.” sermon for 1st Sunday in Lent

Luke 10:25-42
25 Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?” 26 He said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?” 27 He answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.” 28 And he said to him, “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.” 29 But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” 30 Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. 31 Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. 32 So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33 But a Samaritan while traveling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. 34 He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. 35 The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, “Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.’ 36 Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?” 37 He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.” 38 Now as they went on their way, he entered a certain village, where a woman named Martha welcomed him into her home. 39 She had a sister named Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet and listened to what he was saying. 40 But Martha was distracted by her many tasks; so she came to him and asked, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to do all the work by myself? Tell her then to help me.” 41 But the Lord answered her, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and distracted by many things; 42 there is need of only one thing. Mary has chosen the better part, which will not be taken away from her.”

Me: I can’t find it. I get here early, I try to get things organized, and nothing works. I don’t even know why I try. It’s as if I should just show up and wing everything. I don’t even know why I try to be organized.
L: Pastor, eat this. (Handing me a snickers bar)
Me: A snickers?
L: You’re not you, when you’re hungry — eat a snickers, “Better”?
Maybe that was Martha’s problem. Maybe she was just hangry. You know—hangry, the combination of hungry and angry, describing how irritable some people get. So instead of preaching sermon, after sermon, about Martha being distracted and and self absorbed. How Martha serves as an example of a judgmental goody-goody. When all she could have been was simply hangry. After doing exactly what she was supposed to do. Martha had invited Jesus and his people, his disciples, the people who were following him, invited them into her home. This wasn’t just some casual, hey you want to come over for some coffee. Hospitality, caring for strangers, taking care of travelers is central to who the people of God are. I do not think it is a mere coincidence that we hear about Martha immediately after the parable of the samaritan neighbor. 
Martha is doing exactly what she is supposed to. Opening her home, sharing her food, her bread with Jesus and his fellow travelers. And you know what? Sometimes doing what we are supposed to do can feel, can be overwhelming. It is stressful, a lot of times it is doing the humdrum, mundane, daily routine. It often goes unrecognized and unrewarded, and the tasks seem unending, and the challenges daunting. Maybe Martha was really really hungry for just a little support, you know maybe someone to just help with the dishes, with a little clean up, before everybody sits down to listen to Jesus. Maybe Martha is feeling disrespected and taken advantage of. Whatever it is Martha is hungering for something. I think we, perhaps at least some of us can really relate to Martha. Today as the church, we are tasked with meeting the not only the needs of our people. We need too need to be fed. Our spirits need to be nourished; we need to continually learn and grow in our faith, we need to be taught. But the church can not just be focused on ourselves. We must to try to connect with the people who don’t come to church—to get a taste of what God’s Spirit is up to out there. And then of course, there’s the justice work that is more and more pressing with every passing day. With all that, I know that I have asked, prayed, no I have cried out, sworn, “Lord do you not care?”.  
We need something more meaty (I don’t know what vegetarians say), substantial.

not just a quick sugary sappy platitudes. So, no mere candy bar, no matter how tasty or satisfying, will fix—will do.  
And so, remember this Jesus doesn’t denigrate or bad mouth Martha, just as Jesus doesn’t simply dismiss the religious lawyer. Jesus invites Martha, invites us to sit, together, regularly to sit and be fed. And no, I don’t have some secret stash of snickers to share. Because the nougat, peanuts, caramel, and even chocolate, no matter how tasty, will not satisfy the hunger in our souls. We need to be fed with the Word of God, in the scripture, in the words of the liturgy, in the words of forgiveness. In the singing of our songs, and the music of our choir and Diane our spirits can be fed. So Jesus invites us to sit and listen, and Jesus invites us to share our stories, and Jesus invites us to eat, to be fed.
Every week, we are gathered around this table, and like most family tables we eat together. We don’t just happen to sit next to one another, but we share the same meal.   

In a story posted on NPR’s show the Hidden Brain, Shankar Vedantam reports on an amazing thing that happens when we eat together. But it isn’t just like at some restaurant or buffet. Researcher AYELET FISHBACH: I think that food really connects people. Food is about bringing something into the body. And to eat the same food suggests that we are both willing to bring the same thing into our bodies. People just feel closer to people who are eating the same food as they do. And then trust, cooperation, these are just consequences of feeling close to someone. In some experiments, eating the same thing together enabled groups of people to come to agreement almost 2x faster than groups that were eating different foods.
Jesus invites Martha, Jesus invites us, to sit down, to have her physical hunger met, to have her spiritual, and emotional hunger filled. It is no wonder that the church has gathered around the table to not just symbolically eat, but literally eat with one another. To hear not just for ourselves, but for all those around us. You can be the you, you are meant to be. Hear, feel, taste the love of God when we eat the bread and hear the words, The body of Christ given, broken for you—and you can be, you are you, when you are loved. Amen.

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